A new telecommuting offer turned out to be a scam for a woman in Kansas City, Kansas

A recent college graduate has a warning for others after she thought she had secured a new job. She got scammed instead. Miranda Owens said it happened when she interviewed for a job at the end of last month. Now she owes her bank almost $5,000 because a check she deposited from a prospective employer turned out to be fake.” I’m not going to lie, it’s really hard,” she said. “Because I didn’t have that much money in my bank account when it all started, I was really cashing in on this new job.” Owens moved from France to pursue education at Cottey College in Nevada, Missouri. She graduated in 2020 with a degree in psychology. Since she does not have car, she began applying for remote jobs and eventually fell for a scam that offered her remote work at a scammer posing as a reputable company. “I looked at the Better Business Bureau. They’re legit,” she said. “I looked up the people on Indeed, they’re actually legit on LinkedIn.” When Owens thought she had secured the job, her prospective employer sent her a fake check to deposit in her bank to buy office supplies. told her to send money through Zelle to buy office supplies from a supply company that she later found out was fake. That transaction was closed, Owens said. So, the scammer, posing as an employer, told her to send $4,500 in Bitcoin from machine at a convenience store in Kansas City, Kansas, to the office supply company that turned out to be a scam. Owens told KMBC 9 Investigates that she was confident she had a safe and secure job offer. But she wanted to share her story as a warning because she is working to recover the money that is now gone.” We are the generation that should have been able to handle this best. Still, I’m here,” she said. “I just really want people like me to be careful.” Owens has also started a GoFundMe to help recover money to pay off her debt. The Federal Trade Commission said that no legitimate employer will send you a check and then ask you to send that money somewhere else. The agency has tips on job scams here. A Bank of America spokesperson issued a statement urging people to watch this video as they consider sending digital payments. “Fraudsters may also try to trick an individual into processing the transaction themselves as part of a scam,” said U.S. Bank spokesman Evan Lapiska. β€œThe best defense against fraud is to be alert to red flags in educational materials, call your financial institution immediately if you suspect something may be wrong, and do not send payments to individuals you do not know or trust.” A Zelle spokesperson referred Owens’ case to the U.S. bank for further research. She encouraged people to visit Zelle’s resource page for more information.

A recent college graduate has a warning for others after she thought she had secured a new job. She was betrayed instead.

Miranda Owens said it happened when she interviewed for a job at the end of last month.

Now she owes her bank nearly $5,000 because a check she deposited from a prospective employer turned out to be fake.

“I’m not going to lie, it’s really hard,” she said. “Because I didn’t have that much money in my bank account when it all started, I was really banking on this new job.”

Owens moved from France to pursue education at Cottey College in Nevada, Missouri. She graduated in 2020 with a degree in psychology. Since she doesn’t have a car, she started applying for remote jobs.

She eventually fell for a scam that offered her a remote job at a con man posing as a reputable company.

“I looked at the Better Business Bureau. They’re legit,” she said. “I looked up the people on Indeed, they’re actually legit on LinkedIn.”

When Owens thought she had secured the job, her prospective employer sent her a forged check to deposit at her bank to buy office supplies.

When it cleared, the scammer told her to send money through Zelle to buy office supplies from a supply company that she later discovered was fake.

That business was closed, Owens said.

So, the scammer, posing as the employer, instructed her to send $4,500 in Bitcoin from a machine in a Kansas City, Kansas, convenience store to the office supply company, which turned out to be a fraud.

Owens told KMBC 9 Investigates that she is confident she has a safe and secure job offer. But she wanted to share her story as a warning as she works to recover the now-gone money.

“We are the generation that should have been able to deal with this the best. Yet here I am,” she said. “I just really want people like me to be careful.”

Owens has also started a GoFundMe to help recover money to pay off her debt.

The Federal Trade Commission said no legitimate employer will send you a check and then ask you to wire the money somewhere else. The agency has tips on job scams here.

A Bank of America spokesperson released a statement urging people to watch this video as they consider sending digital payments.

“Fraudsters may also try to trick an individual into processing the transaction themselves as part of a scam,” said U.S. Bank spokesman Evan Lapiska. “The best defense against fraud is to be alert for signals that are detailed in educational materials, call your financial institution immediately if you suspect something may be wrong, and do not send payments to individuals you do not know or trust.”

Zelle’s spokeswoman referred Owens’ case to U.S. Bank for further investigation. She encouraged people to visit Zelle’s resource page for more information.

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